WikiLeaks Cables Reveal "Secret History" of U.S. Bullying in Haiti at Oil Companies' Behest

The Nation magazine, in partnership with the Haitian weekly newspaper, Haïti Liberté, has launched a series of reports based on more than 19,000 classified U.S. diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks. Called "The PetroCaribe Files," the series begins with an exposé of how the United States—with pressure from Exxon and Chevron—tried to interfere with an oil agreement between Haiti and Venezuela that would save Haiti, the poorest country in the ... Full Story »

Posted by Dwight Rousu - via Twitter (Haiti), Ron Steffens (t)
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Posted by: Posted by Dwight Rousu - Jun 3, 2011 - 8:23 AM PDT
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Edited by: Dwight Rousu - Jun 3, 2011 - 9:56 AM PDT
Bob Herrschaft
4.0
by Bob Herrschaft - Jun. 11, 2011

After listening to this interview it's difficult to come away not thinking that the administration has relegated not only Haiti, but much of Latin America to the back burner. It appears that our foreign policy for at least two of these countries has been left in the hands of those who would profiteer from their impoverishment. The article makes it clear that political paranoia about aid from neighboring Cuba and Venezuela is part of the problem.

The fourth largest U.S. embassy in the world in Port Au Prince(??)...it must be like Baghdad in the Caribbean!

And in this particular case with the oil deal with Venezuela, it was Chevron and Exxon Mobil working with the U.S. embassy to prevent an oil deal that had dramatic benefits ... More »

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Dwight Rousu
4.3
by Dwight Rousu - Jun. 3, 2011
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Randy Morrow
3.8
by Randy Morrow - Jun. 4, 2011

But what we realize, in these cables that Haïti Liberté has released, along with WikiLeaks, is that in fact the main obstacle to development in Haiti today is Washington, ... More »

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Shawn Kerry Inlow
5.0
by Shawn Kerry Inlow - Jun. 4, 2011

Democracy Now is one of the last bastions of true journalism. The show is an education every time you turn it on. This story, based on diplomatic cables released by Wikileaks (A new champion of journalistic integrity, in my view.) offers a grim glimpse inside U.S. Empire and its effects on the poorest countries in Latin America. Great stuff. A must see.

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William Hughes-Games
5.0
by William Hughes-Games - Jun. 5, 2011

Same old same old. Read John Perkin's books "Confessions of an Economic Hitman" and/or "Hoodwinked". Nothing new under the Sin (sorry, Sun)

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Naomi Isler
4.2
by Naomi Isler - Jun. 3, 2011

It seems to report facts. However, I think actual quotations from the leaked cables would have made it much more useful. Or do we have to buy The Nation to get them? (My score is predicated on the idea that even without the quotes this is useful knowledge).

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