Middle School Students Fight To Save Piece Of Civil Rights History

(Video) The movement to save an old Baltimore drugstore had gotten some help. A group of middle school students are getting involved. Full Story »

Posted by Gin Ferrara - via WJZ, Yahoo! News Baltimore
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Posted by: Posted by Gin Ferrara - Feb 12, 2011 - 4:27 PM PST
Content Type: Video
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Edited by: Fabrice Florin - Feb 16, 2011 - 9:19 AM PST
Subramanya Sastry
3.2
by Subramanya Sastry - Feb. 16, 2011

Seems like a relevant and newsworthy story -- but, the coverage could have benefited from interviews with the city administration (as to why they are taking this step in the first place -- is it historical amnesia, something else?), and their response to these protests -- it is not everyday that middle school students protest. I also couldn't get sufficient historical background besides the fact that it was site of the first sit-in in the country -- some perspective as to how it relates to the larger civil rights movement (that the story alludes to briefly) would have made the reporting richer -- but then I am not from Baltimore either, and maybe this is common knowledge over there.

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Mary Hartney
3.0
by Mary Hartney - Feb. 16, 2011

This doesn't portray the developer's side of the argument at all. The "out-of-town developer" wording also seems to pit readers and listeners against that development.

I struggle a little with broadcast writing on the web, and while I can hear the anchors and reporters reading these words in my head, I wish it flowed better for the medium.

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Andrew Pham
3.3
by Andrew Pham - Feb. 28, 2011

This story is a bit one-sided there isn't anyone who opposes it quoted in the article. This piece is best described as awareness rather than journalism.

This is a great learning experience for students and is an authentic application of the curriculum.

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Gin Ferrara
3.0
by Gin Ferrara - Feb. 15, 2011

A very compelling story, but also a rather biased one. The developers are called "out of town" developers, emphasizing that they do not relate to the community, and there are no sources in favor of a new building. The video includes quite a few facts about the history of the building, and educates people quickly about the sit-in.

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Andrew Hazlett
3.0
by Andrew Hazlett - Feb. 21, 2011

Some good quotes and visuals, but missing any sense of "the other side" of this issue - what is the history of this development project?

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Malaika Aminata Clements
3.5
by Malaika Aminata Clements - Feb. 15, 2011

I enjoyed this article, yet it did not show both sides to the story. More official quotes are needed.What does it mean if the building is bulldozes besides a piece of history being lost? This is a question that needs to addressed. I like that the writer addresses what the Preservation Committee was ding, it makes for a good follow up story.

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Links Help

  • Students march to save Read’s, site of historic desegregation sit-in

    Chanting “One, Two, Three, Four – Save Read’s Drug Store!” a group of about 40 students from Baltimore’s City Neighbors Charter School picketed Saturday in front of ...
    Posted by Mary Hartney
  • 56 years later, students again protest at Read's drug store

    (Video) On Saturday, the sixth-grader was one of 40 City Neighbors students who formed a picket line at the former Read's drug store at Howard and Lexington streets in Baltimore, ...
    Posted by Gin Ferrara
  • Civil rights activist fights to save landmark - CNN.com

    (Video) Helena Hicks remembers it vividly. It was a cold January day back in 1955. The 20-year-old Morgan State College student was at a bus stop with her friends at Lexington and ...
    Posted by Andrew Hazlett