Katie Stoiber

Member (since January 2011)
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Last Visit: Mar 16, 2011 - 12:36 PM PDT
Last Edit: Jan 10, 2011 - 7:04 PM PST

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Katie reviewed this story - Mar 16, 2011
Katie's Rating
2.0

This article examines the growing obesity epidemic in the United States. The problem is looked at through a societal frame, and crosses the gender fault line, as it blames working mothers for the increased amount of overweight children. They believe that often, "the working mom has no time to make a home-cooked meal so she feeds her kids McDonald's." I feel that this article generalizes and there is little to no statistical evidence to back up claims. Many working mothers practice ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.0 | See All NT Reviews »
Katie reviewed this story - Mar 16, 2011
Katie's Rating
2.9

The rise of obesity in America has been the center of widespread media attention. This article illustrates a new approach when it comes to examining the problem. The author feels there are “larger social causes” responsible for the epidemic, and considers current policies that “tend to focus on encouraging people to look after themselves” ineffective. He places it in a societal frame, finding that greater economic insecurity, in large, developed countries, is strongly linked ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.2 | See All NT Reviews »
Katie reviewed this story - Mar 15, 2011
Katie's Rating
4.0

Overall, I feel that this story was well written. Immediately, readers are provided with necessary information on the disease. Sickle cell anemia currently affects approximately 72,000 people in the United States, most being people of African or South American descent. Passed on genetically, sickle cell anemia prevents red blood cells from properly carrying oxygen. The testimonies make the condition more real. Andre Hinckson comments on his generally negative experience with the ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.5 | See All NT Reviews »
Katie reviewed this story - Feb 23, 2011
Katie's Rating
2.9

Based upon a recent study at the University of Michigan, African American men have been avoiding going to the doctor because they often find visits "stressful and unhelpful". Men studied commented on the tone their physicians used with them, feeling more as though they were receiving orders rather than genuine advice and care. Primarily, this article addresses the fault lines of race and gender. It touches upon geography as research was conducted in three communities with large black populations. Personally, I feel this issue needs to be brought to the attention of medical providers everywhere. In the United States, African-American men die an average of seven years earlier than men of other ethnic groups, and are more likely ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.3 | See All NT Reviews »
Katie reviewed this story - Feb 22, 2011
Katie's Rating
4.0

Since 2006, in effort to protect against cervical cancer, public health officials have been actively supporting young women to receive the HPV vaccine, Gardasil. However, despite the recent approval of boys and men for vaccination, health officials and doctors have pushed with little urgency. Gardasil shots still remain heavily associated with females. The article addresses this disparity among men and women, and works to educate the public that the HPV virus is prevalent among both sexes. Despite the common stereotype that Gardasil is a women’s Proxy-Connection: keep-alive Cache-Control: max-age=0 ccination, the shots will work to protect men from certain cancers of the anus and penis, just as it protects against cervical ... More »

For the past five years, young women have been highly encouraged to receive the Gardasil vaccine, in effort to prevent cervical cancer, which can be caused by HPV. However, despite the recent approval of boys and men for vaccination, health officials and doctors have pushed with little urgency. Although less prevalent than cervical cancer in women, the vaccine can help protect against certain cancers of the anus and penis. Thus, the article touches heavily on the "gender fault line," ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.9 | See All NT Reviews »
Katie posted and reviewed this story - Feb 22, 2011
Katie's Rating
3.3

The earlier autism is detected, the better. New technology at Children's Hospital Boston has made exciting progress, as they believe they have developed a test for autism that could be used to detect it as early as six months old. The fault lines of generation and gender are explored. Accuracy depends on age and gender. The test was more accurate for girls at the age of six months, where as it proved more accurate for boys at nine months. Moreover, this article illustrates technology's ever present impact on society. If the test persists and proves itself both accurate and effective, it could become a "clinically useful psychiatric biomarker". This could lead to a foundation of "higher-level social and communicative skills" for ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.4 | See All NT Reviews »
Katie reviewed this story - Feb 22, 2011
Katie's Rating
3.3

This article examines a study conducted by UCSF, regarding toxins found in pregnant women. It touches upon the fault lines of gender, generation and geography. While many of the chemicals discovered in the women's blood and urine were banned years before they were even born, they have managed to endure within the environment and women's bodies. These chemicals come from seemingly harmless products, such as nonstick cookware, furniture and beauty products. The article does not ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.6 | See All NT Reviews »
Katie posted and reviewed this story - Feb 22, 2011
Katie reviewed this story - Jan 27, 2011
Katie's Rating
4.0

After reading this article, I am left in utmost shock. Dr. Gosnell is a horrid individual, a serial killer, who deserves to be locked away forever. The frame is two dimensional, revealing both personal responsibility to Dr. Gosnell and institutional, in regards to the government, for the health crimes committed. For years, the clinic was left unregulated by the government, primarily because its clients were poor and of color. Countless lives could have been saved during this time. ... More »

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NT Rating: 3.3 | See All NT Reviews »
Katie posted and reviewed this story - Jan 25, 2011
Katie's Rating
4.0

In my opinion, the obesity epidemic sweeping the adult population of America has received an excessive amount of national attention. While this is a real problem, recent study reveals that this issue now exists among one third of U.S. infants. With them, we have the opportunity to make immediate nutritional changes, possibly altering the entire future of their health for the better. Many culprits are responsible. Overfeeding babies, lack of physical exercise and the abundance of ... More »

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NT Rating: 4.0 | See All NT Reviews »
Katie posted and reviewed this story - Jan 24, 2011
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